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tv   ABC World News Now  ABC  July 29, 2010 1:05am-3:00am PST

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♪ but we love eating totino's the most. we live for fun... ...friends... [ both ] ...and best of all.. [ all ] ...our favorite... ...eating totino's! ♪ we're the kids in america ♪ oh, oh, oh ♪ we're the kids in...
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oprah: tyler perry gave us his signature. >> i'm signing it now. oprah: but that's not all. his entire studio took the "no phone zone" pledge. >> no phone zone. oprah: that is something to cheer about. [cheering] >> ♪ just keep coming around what do you want from me? what do you want from me? what do you want from me? ♪ oprah: what does it feel like when you're performing like that? >> it's an adrenaline rush. it's--it feels like--kind of like a fiery feeling. oprah: mm-hmm. >> it feels good. oprah: does it feel like everything's in sync for you and all is right with the world? >> yeah, you line up. you line up with everything, yeah. oprah: yeah. so simon cowell made it official. >> yeah. he's done. oprah: can you believe that? that it's going to be his last season on "american idol"? what do you think of that? >> i mean, i think the audience will definitely miss simon, and i think the contestants will miss out on, like, really honest
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criticism. i mean, sometimes it can be a little personal. and i know other contestants took it to heart. sometimes, they got really stressed out about what he would say, and--i think that that's important to making you a better performer, is you got to hear the good and the bad. oprah: do you think he makes people better performers? >> yeah. he makes you step your game up, you know, and calls you out when it doesn't work. oprah: yeah. and do you think he's usually right on? >> usually, yeah, but he also--i personally think he's got a very specific taste. you know, there are certain things that he's just not into. oprah: yeah, yeah. >> for example, country music. he doesn't like it. so-- oprah: yeah. yeah, yeah, yeah. >> you know, i mean-- oprah: we've seen that. >> and then certain--you know, certain things that i did on the show, he was, like, "eh, i don't know." but that's not his style. oprah: but when you hear him say something, like the moment where he said to you, "tonight you emerged as a star," you believe it? >> yeah. i mean, it was nice to hear. oprah: do you think the show will go on without him? will the show be as effective, as strong without him? >> you know, i think that ultimately, after the first couple weeks of auditions--the audience tunes in every week for the contestants. mostly. i mean, i think people tune in to--they
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grow fond of one or a couple of the people, and they get behind them, and they're invested in them. and of course, it's great to hear--"ok, what's simon going to say?" oprah: mm-hmm. >> but we tune in to hear the--you know, to watch the contestants blossom or not. oprah: i'm really excited that ellen's going to be on. >> i am, too. yeah, she's great. oprah: yeah. i think ellen's going to be a great addition. >> she's going to be great. i mean, i know people are going to miss paula. paula's amazing. she is a--she has such a good heart. [applause] she really does. oprah: she was always the kind one. yes. >> yeah. yeah, and that--you know, what she brought to the judging panel was just as important as what simon brings. because it's positive ht. ent. oprah: right. >> even if at home-- oprah: yeah, because you can't have everybody being the same. that's what was so great about it. >> yeah. and at home, the audience might, you know--"what's simon going to say?" you know, because as a--as a society, we get obsessed with the negative. but i think as a contestant on the show, hearing that positive is really important-- oprah: yeah. >> to your own growth and your own self-worth as a performer. oprah: well, it's wonderful to see you. >> you, too. oprah: thank you, adam. adam's cd, "for your entertainment." go to oprah.com for one more special performance from adam. he's going to do it when we go off air. [cheering and applause]
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oprah: audience, you're going home with adam and susan's cd's. bye, everybody! bye, everybody! >> note] just don't give up i'm working it out please don't give in i won't let you down... ♪ [captioning made possible by king world] [captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org--] ok. what if i just had a small slice? i was good today, i deserve it! or, i could have a medium slice and some celery sticks and they would ccel each other out, right? or...ok. i could ha one large slice and jog in place as i eat it or...ok. how about one large slice while jogging in place followed by eight celery... mmm raspberrcheesecake... i have been thinking about this all day. wow, and you've lost weight! oh yeah, you're welcome. thank you! [ female announcer ] yop. with 30 delicious flavors yoplait. it is so good.
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it will compete with apple's popular ipad. the new kindle is available for preorder and the cost, $139. it ships at the end of next month. amazon's e-books now outsell the company's hard-cover books. >> changing times. now to medical news. and recommendations on the simplified techniques for cpr. >> two new studies show any untrained person can save a life, and our senior medical editor dr. richard besser shows us what we need to know. >> reporter: in that moment of crisis, you only need to know two simple steps to save a life. first, call 911. then, start cpr, but with just chest compressions. the two new studies confirm for bystanders with no training, chest compressions on adults are enough to restore life and there is no benefit to performing mouth to mouth resuscitation. here's why chest compressions alone work. after you've stopped breathing there's enough air in your lungs to keep you will alive until
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help usually arrives. but that oxygen must be circulated throughout your body, to your brain, to your heart. pumping the chest moves that oxygen around. pausing that pumping to breathe into the victim's mouth means a break in that critical circulation to the heart, increasing the risk of death. after you call 911, position yourself directly over the chest of the victim. one hand in the center of the chest, the other on top. then begin to pump, hard and fast. remember, 100 beats per minute. if you can't remember that, then remember this. ♪ staying alive, staying alive >> reporter: do chest compressions to the beat of "staying alive." ♪ staying alive >> reporter: only one-third of those who go into cardiac arrest get cpr from a bystander. the hope is that by making it easier to do, more people will be willing to do it. >> if you haven't been trained in cpr, should you give it a shot anyway? >> yeah, you're not going to -- i always say that. we teach residents here.
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so we teach doctors. you're not going to make somebody more dead. >> reporter: these results apply to cpr by untrained people on adults only. cpr for children must still include mouth to mouth resuscitation. these are exciting studies that will hopefully lead people to act to save people's lives. richard besser, abc news, new york. >> that's interesting. good advice, most studies suggest people are much more willing to help out if mouth to mouth is not required. >> one of the best tips i've heard is if you go the distance between your navel -- your navel to your nose, halfway is where you hands should be. i think most people don't know. and you're pushing so hard you might break bones because you're triggering the heart through all the bones. >> you need to press hard. it's not like a light tap. >> i'm with you, i don't want to put my mouth on random mouths. >> just in general. in a moment we'll return to our top story on this thursday morning. >> the federal ruling on arizona's immigration law and the immediate impact.
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now back to our top story this morning. the blocking of the most controversial aspects of arizona's new immigration law.
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>> opponents have won this battle but its supporters say it's not the beginning -- it is the beginning, rather, of a big legal battle. here is "american landscape" coverage from knxv in phoenix. >> reporter: a bump in the road. that's how governor jan brewer described the federal judge's decision to block parts of the immigration law. abc 15's lori jane gliha is in tucson where the governor made several appearances today, and the governor telling us the fight isn't over and the state will soon appeal. >> reporter: governor brewer says her fight is far from over, she's been speaking with her legal counsel all day. she says though she is disappointed, she calls this ruling temporary. >> myself and my counsel believe that the senate bill 1070 was constitutional. we liked it all, of course, and we would have liked to have seen it all upheld. >> reporter: governor jan brewer says she will not quit in her fight to put all sections of the new immigration law into effect, calling a judge's ruling temporary, and a little bump in the road. >> jan brewer's not a quitter.
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the people of arizona's not a quitter. >> reporter: brewer explained supporters and opponents anticipated appeals all along depending on the judge's decision. now she says the fight is far from over. and argues the federal government must step up and take action to better keep arizona citizens safe. >> the federal government got relief from the courts to not to do their job. >> reporter: democratic gubernatorial candidate terry goddard turned to the internet to send brewer a message. >> terry goddard says you play politics with immigration and lost. what do you have to say to his tweet or do you have a tweet back to him? what do you think of that? >> terry goddard needs to do his job. >> reporter: continuously brewer has been calling on the federal government to do their jobs. she says she has plans to file an expedited appeal. in tucson, lori jane gliha. abc 15 news. a phoenix police officer also filed a suit challenging the law and calls the judge's decision a step in the right
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direction. abc 15's corey rangel spoke with one of the officers today. that officer says he's happy the judge stepped in and took action. >> reporter: the officer says he's relieved and overjoyed, and in his own words, says he's glad the judge saw the truth. officer david salgado filed one of seven lawsuits challenging senate bill 1070, saying it was unconstitutional. as a police officer he says he worries the law would lead to racial profiling, even though the bill had wording prohibiting that. now salgado says the judge's ruling has put most of his concerns at ease. >> now that we hear the judge was in favor of the federal government, and hopefully ours, that we'll stop this from -- as a police officer, that i will treat everybody equally. everybody, all ethnics. >> reporter: and the judge has not issued a ruling in salgado's case specifically, but his attorney says the ruling today suggests that it would apply to all of the lawsuits filed against the law.
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reporting live at the federal courthouse, corey rangel, abc 15 news. >> maricopa county attorney rick romley has pushed for immigration enforcement that focuses on violent criminals, not people in the country illegally. he says the injunction offers an opportunity. >> it is time for the federal government to deal with immigration reform. they need to understand, the federal government needs to clearly understand, they have not just failed arizona, but they have failed the rest of this nation. >> reporter: romley had questioned some of the wording of the law and a few potentially unconstitutional provisions, such as detaining suspects indefinitely to verify their immigration status. a big supporter of the law says he won't let today's decision stop him from doing his job. arpaio says he understands the judge's decision and respects it. but sheriff arpaio added it won't stop him from cracking down on illegal immigration. >> i'm sure she has a rationale for her decision.
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i don't think it's going to really hurt the fight against illegal immigration. you look at other laws, other federal laws that can be enforced. >> tomorrow, sheriff arpaio says his department is still planning a crime suppression sweep to coincide with the start of the now-modified new immigration law. he's keeping most of the details secret but says it will most likely happen around noon. the white house says president obama is not commenting on today's ruling. previously, the president had come out against the new law. president obama said he felt it interfered with federal immigration law and that it would lead to racial profiling. >> that was coverage from knxv in phoenix. >> and again, some parts of the law do go into effect or have gone into effect. you can no longer pick up and transport day laborers across the state. it is illegal to give a ride or harbor an illegal alien. some parts in effect right now. and finally this half hour, getting your hands on some history. if you fight to sleep in the middle of the night,
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and finally this half hour, getting your hands on some history. starting today, get this, a set of false teeth worn by winston churchill goes up for bid. just in time for christmas. >> ew. ew. the teeth helped the prime minister give some of the most inspirational speeches of world war ii, and now they can be yours. the bbc's mark worthington reports. >> we shall fight on the seas and oceans. we shall fight with growing confidence and growing strength in the air -- >> reporter: the unmistakable words of winston churchill. inspirational and instantly recognizable. >> we shall fight on the
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beaches. >> reporter: churchill had a natural speech impediment but thought his distinctive voice a crucial tool in winning the second world war. safe in a norfolk vault, the unlikely weapon in the war effort. a set of gold dentures specifically designed to preserve churchill's lisp and to keep his voice unaltered on the airwaves. >> we shall never surrender. >> reporter: churchill's dentures were made by a young dental technician called derek cudlipp, and they've been in his family since churchill's death. >> my father's work was very important to churchill. when my father's call-up papers came through, churchill asked for him, asked for the papers, and they were torn up in front of him. and churchill said to him, "you're going though where, you're staying here." >> what's making you sell these now? >> they've been in a drawer for
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many years. i'd like to see them on show to the wider public. >> reporter: at the royal college of surgeons in london the only other surviving set is one of the most popular exhibits. here, flanked by the teeth of royalty, churchill's dentures have pride of place. >> these are the teeth that saved the world. without them, he wouldn't have been able to deliver many of the great speeches that we know from the second world war. "we'll fight them on the beaches" would never have sounded the same. >> yes, who indeed would have thought this would be the most exceptional and most talked-about item i've ever sold at auction. >> reporter: curci dentures are valued at 5,000 pounds. the auctioneers say they could fetch tens of thousands when they go under the hammer. mark worthington, bbc news, norfolk. >> wow. apparently churchill loved his nomdim nighmuch he actually that's how close the two were.
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important chompers. >> i've never heard of this before but he apparently hpipipo
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fatal rampage. at least one bear attacks campers inside their tents. why montana investigators are puzzled. then, fierce flames. windswept fires force hundreds from their california homes. the threat, and today's outlook. and, delayed degree. a college honor decades late. >> i was sad, i was hurt. >> one school's decision and its lifelong impact. it's thursday, july 29th. >> from abc news, this is "world news now." >> salutatorian of her high school and denied acceptance into university because of her
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skin color. >> amazing. and they made it up to her 60 years -- better late than never, i guess, the lesson of that story. >> it's a great story in terms of how her family's impacted by what she was unable to accomplish. stick around for that one. good morning and thanks for being with us on this thursday. i'm vinita nair. >> and i'm rob nelson. it was a nightmare come true for campers in montana. >> a bear, or bears, went tent to tent attacking people. one man is dead and two victims went to the hospital. >> it happened outside cooke city, montana, near yellowstone national park. brad wheelis reports. >> reporter: the fatal rampage in montana's soda springs campground happened before dawn wednesday. as campers overheard the victims' screams while taking cover in parked cars. there were a total of three victims in three tents. the man who died from his injuries was alone in a tent. another victim, a woman, suffered lacerations and crushed
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bones. the third victim, another male, suffered bite wounds to his leg. all the victims were torn from their tents in a series of attacks that puzzle wildlife experts. >> the investigation so far has revealed that everything was done right, we don't have any signs of improper food storage or food in the area. >> reporter: campers are often warned food can lure bears. wildlife expert jack hannah was prepared when a grizzly threatened him while on a hike in montana this week. his wife managed to take pictures while hannah reached for his pepper spray. >> i take my pepper spray and unload the first blast. the wind's blowing, it blew the
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damn pepper spray right away. i unload the whole thing in his face. right? and went backwards, he went backwards, then he took off. >pa pservounct backwards, then he took off. >pa pservounct bra abco cf anial -pria the family foune st that scare follows those several recent bear sightings there. >> looking for a friend, maybe. >> that's right. thousands of firefighters are on the front li two wildfires burning north of los angeles. dozens of buildings were destroyed, more than 2,000 people were evacuated. clayton sandell is near tehachapi. >> reporter: the wildfire continues to threaten about 150 homes in this community. some 70 miles north of los angeles. while firefighters have partially surrounded the blaze near the town of tehachapi, at least 30 homes were destroyed on tuesday. tim shurry's vintage motorcycles were reduced to rubble. >> i've lost my retirement. i've lost my savings. it's gone.
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yamaha 1968, yamaha dt-1. >> reporter: but his home survived. thanks to his goat, eating the surrounding brush. >> my hero, right here. >> reporter: the blaze began around 3:00 p.m. tuesday. within hours the swift-moving fire had scorched hundreds of acres, devouring homes and cars in its path. the heat was so intense, it caused propane tanks to explode, sending debris hundreds of feet into the air. >> this mountain has been so beautiful. and now it looks like the moon. >> reporter: some residents had only enough time to grab their dogs and cats and head to an evacuation center. it was the same for residents escaping a second even larger fire near kernville. >> i'm out here in shorts, t-shirt and sandals. it's the same thing i had on yesterday. by tomorrow that becomes a problem. >> reporter: hundreds of firefighters are on the scene and many are on the way. governor schwarzenegger has declared a state of emergency and has ordered more resources into the area. luckily, temperatures are only
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moderate, in the low 80s. meanwhile, the cause of this fire is under investigation. clayton sandell, abc news, near tehachapi, california. parts of the arizona immigration law ar t effect today as scheduled. but the most controversial aspects of the law, making it a crime to live and work in that state without papers, has now been put on hold by a federal judge. arizona's governor says the ruling though is just a bump in the road. >> we knew regardless of what happened today, of course, that one side or the other side was going to appeal. so this begins the process. >> change the powers that be to make sure that we're no longer targeted as a community. >> reporter: arizona's legal team goes to a federal appeals court in san francisco today to fight the judge's ruling. but the case would ultimately be decided by the u.s. supreme court. it is estimated there are 500,000 undocumented immigrants in arizona. barbara pinto has their reaction to the federal ruling. >> reporter: in a matter of minutes, relief replaced dread.
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hope replaced fear. in this latino neighborhood in central phoenix -- >> happy emotions. >> happy emotions? what goes through your mind? >> that it's going to get better. there's hope. >> reporter: rosario peralta, who's here legally, watched customers in her family's grocery store disappear. frightened families moving out of state. some of them came back. >> i was really worried for all our customers. it's been slow. but thank god everything's right. >> reporter: in a conversation with diane sawyer, erika, a recent college graduate, feared for her future. >> i want to stay here in this country. i mean, this is my home. >> reporter: she crossed the border with her mom, sister and brothers illegally when she was 11 years old. running from domestic abuse.
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>> i went to bed really depressed. it's been like everything just came back. like the hope fades knowineporo happy. 60% of americans support arizona's crackdown on illegal immigrants. support for the law is twice as high among whites than nonwhites. >> i was in shock and a little bit disappointed. working in the trucking business. >> just a consistent record of the federal government not doing anything and that's disappointing. >> randy pullen leads arizona's republican party. >> i think they're celebrating a little early. they might want to wait until the judge has heard all the arguments. >> repouldke men > ordets fm federal officials say a temporary cap is holding firm and there's very little oil sheen on the water's surface. if all goes well, crews could begin work on that important step as soon as sunday night. michigan's governor is blasting efforts to clean up a pipeline oil spill along the
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ker. she says the work is "woefully inadequate." the pipeline company has promised to double its workforce. more than 1 million gallons of oil have spilled from that broken pipeline. now here is a look at your thursday weather. stormy in the dakotas with a chance of tornados. heavy rain from arizona to wyoming. thunderstorms in the northeast and parts of the south. >> 94 in the big easy. 96 in atlanta. 88 in boston. 80s from the twin cities to kansas city. 96 in dallas. boise climbs to 97. salt lake city 92. portland 83. some toothy new additions are making a splash at a south carolina aquarium. >> four new sandbar sharks made their debut at the aquarium's largest exhibit. the three footer and three babies were caught just off of charleston. they were held in quarantine until the vets were sure they were healthy. >> the new sharks seem to get along just fine with the older ones.
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call this toll-free number now. it's a tale of mistaken identity and an emotional roller coaster for two families. one family is now coping with their daughter's death, after first thinking she was alive. >> while the family of the young woman who was thought to be dead is now sharing their story. andrea canning reports from phoenix. >> i could say a lot of things about abby. right now -- >> reporter: sergio and maria guerra say the fact that their daughter abby is alive is nothing short of a miracle. >> my daughter is a fighter. and all i know is that she's living this long, that means she keeps fighting. >> reporter: it's a miracle because just ten days ago they
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received the shattering news every parent fears. they were told abby had been killed in a car accident. the star college soccer player was traveling home with friends from disneyland on july 18th when a tire blew and their suv flipped several times. two passengers were killed, three were critically injured. authorities reported that abby, just 19 years old, had died at the scene. her best friend, marlena cantu, was taken to the hospital and clinging to life. the cantu family rushed to their daughter's side. her injuries so bad, she was unrecognizable. >> seeing the condition my daughter was -- supposedly my daughter was in was just horrifying. >> reporter: meanwhile the guerras had planned and paid for abby's funeral. >> it's hard to describe. after you're planning a funeral for a week, it's hard. >> reporter: it was a lot to bear for both families, who struggled to move forward as
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they coped with the outcome of such a horrific accident. but then out of the blue came another life-changing visit from police. shocking news that would prove joyous for one family and cruel for another. the whole ordeal was a case of mistaken identity. abby guerra had survived the crash. it was marlena cantu who had died. abby is in critical condition and has endured multiple brain surgeries. the cantus are now left to mourn the loss of marlena. >> it's comforting to know that she's not suffering. she didn't suffer. it was a mistake. it was a mistake they shouldn't have made. evidently the person that, you know, that shouldn't have gotten confused, got confused. >> reporter: how could a tragic mistake have happened in the first place? >> at the time, we were acting on the best information.
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>> reporter: law enforcement and hospital officials claim they used information from the families to identify the patient and pointed to the girl's severe injury as a factor for the mix-up as well. >> sometimes the severity of the situation can impact the patient's visual appearance so dramatically that it is -- they are almost hard to recognize. >> reporter: and the two did look similar. that's marlena on the left and abby on the right. but things just didn't add up. marlena was two inches taller than abby. she still had her wisdom teeth, abby didn't. marlena had a scar from an appendectomy. all signs that could have been discovered from an autopsy. but one wasn't done until five days after the accident. dental records and fingerprints officially confirmed the mix-up. the medical examiner's office blamed the delay on a heavy case load. >> i think as long as human beings are involved in the equation, all that you can hope for is that the best trained,
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best motivated, best qualified folks attend to your needs. and that's what happened here. it's a mistake. >> reporter: officials in arizona have said there is no internal investigation under way, but do acknowledge there is a flaw in the system. >> clearly, there must be ways that we can look at this with fresh eyes and say, is there anything else from an additional standpoint that we can do to add that extra level of precaution? >> reporter: marlena cantu's father just hopes good can come from this painful mistake. >> something has to be done. some good -- i mean, it's got to be -- something's got to be corrected. >> reporter: for now, the guerras are focused on abby's survival. >> the right thing for her is to be alive and to be back at home again. and she's fighting to the last. and i'm pretty sure she will make it. >> reporter: they say they've already lost her once, they don't want to lose her again.
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i'm andrea canning in phoenix. >> wow. >> it is through and through such an unbelievable story. the most shocking thing to me is this has happened many a time before. in 2006 it was two girls from indiana universi oprah: one of the thriftiest families in america shares their money-saving secrets with you. then, she walked away from a six-figure salary to eat -- did you have to go to the dumpster to do that -- garbage. next "oprah."
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welcome back, everybody. this has been all over the talk for a couple of days. president obama going on "the view." was taped yesterday, going to air today at 11:00 eastern, caused a lot of stir whether it was appropriate for the president to be there, for any sitting president to be on a show -- to be on a daytime talk show like this. he did go on yesterday and tape the show with the ladies of "the view." take a listen how the introduction went.
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>> you have -- you've gone through a little bit of a beating the last month. do you really think that being on the show with a bunch of women, five women who never shut up, is going to be calming? >> that is the -- look, i was trying to find a show that michelle actually watched. >> have you ever watched us? >> of course. >> no kidding? >> of course. well, this is the second time i've been on now. >> that's right. that doesn't mean you have to watch it. >> third, third time. >> interesting, a couple of interesting tidbits, he did tackle some of the issues, the economy, the war, so forth. he admitted he didn't know who snooki was from "the jersey shore." >> lucky guy. >> which some people actually liked. and he admitted that he was not invited to the clinton wedding. you've got a theory behind that too maybe? >> it just seems logical to me that he would say -- he's in new york right now thbly uch secor ahat attends so it'sprobter for all that security to say i'm
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not invite >> not going to be there, lee >> who knows, me he snubbed, you never know. >> "the view" oth >> we should also mention quickly, chelsea has chosen a >> made the big decision. >> yeah. people saw her, spotter wang. there's all this talk, pre obama won' want to know what she's wearing it sounds like it w >> sounds like a classicce >> this is the s blogosphere is really humming >> this is the s blogosphere is really humming elisabeth hasselbeck has been known for saying a couple of pofngs that people get really i'm teveoset jus a lt >> more and more women are choosing same-sex partners. even after decades of heterosexuality. why do you think that is? >> is that saying as women get older it's like a been there, done that kind of thing and i'm open to it? >> no, i'll tell you what's happened, older men are going for younger women, leaving the women with no one. >> so basically, what she was implying there is that women are becoming lesbians because they have no other option. immediately joy behar launched
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back at her, she called it ridiculous, she said this is not just walking through the garden with tulips holding hands, this is people's life choices. it was interesting because if you watched the whole thing play out, elisabeth responded with something like, thank you for educating me, obviously irritated at the exchange. a lot of people especially on blogs are talking about it and pointing to some of the other gaffes she's made, referencing erin andrews as someone that dressed provocatively, perhaps bringing on the stalker. >> yeah, that w >> also saying she didn thi people should get t morning-after pill, e rapnces1 oa lople ppy c for weeks. apparently leonardo dicaprio has taken a stand and has pulled out of a movie that mel was going to direct. this is according to radaronline.com. leonardo is basking in the success of "inception" which is doing very well. in light of all these tapes that
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have come out about mel and the alleged physical violence against the girlfriend and the racial slurs and all this leonardo said, i'm backing out, no thanks, he's not going to do the movie. he's taking a stand. you don't need a rematch, but a rethink. with lunesta. lunesta is thought to interact with gaba receptors associated with sleep. lunesta helps you get the restful sleep you need. lunesta has some risk of dependency. when taking lunesta, don't drive or operate machinery until you feel fully awake. walking, eating, driving or engaging in other activities while asleep without remembering it the next day have been reported. abnormal behaviors may include aggressiveness, agitation, hallucinations, or confusion. in depressed patients, worsening of depression, including risk of suicide, may occur. alcohol may increase these risks. allergic reactions such as tongue or throat swelling occur rarely and may be fatal. side effects may include unpleasant taste, headache, dizziness, and morning drowsiness. stop fighting with your sleep. ask your doctor if lunesta is right for you.
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here's some stories to watch today on abc news. shirley sherrod, who was ousted from the agriculture department, addresses a national association of black journalists today. the house ethics committee reveals specific charges against congressman charles rangel of new york today. the new york democrat is accused of misusing his office for fund-raising as well as other allegations. jury deliberations continue in the rod blagojevich corruption case in chicago. the former illinois governor pleaded not guilty to 24 counts. he is accused of trying to sell president obama's senate seat. and finally this half hour, a college graduation six decades in the making. it's the story of one woman's dream that was initially held back by racism. >> she never forgot her dream
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and now with the help of her family, she will soon be holding a college diploma. here's linsey davis. >> reporter: when opportunity knocked 60 years ago, mary price walls was denied the chance to open the door. >> i would have made a wonderful schoolteacher. >> reporter: she was the salutatorian of her high school class. in 1950 she applied to what's now called missouri state university. worse than rejection, the school never responded. they weren't ready to accept a black student. >> i was sad, i was hurt. say that you had been a good girl and your parents promised you a special treat. then when you got ready to eat that cake, it was gone. how would you feel? >> reporter: four years later, in 1954, the supreme court ruled it unconstitutional to deny black children equal education opportunities. for mary, it was too late. she went on to work as an elevator operator, and last year at 77, she retired from her job as a janitor. for years, mary buried the
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rejection and never even told her kids. >> i had heard that my mother was the first black person to apply for and be denied admission to missouri state university. >> reporter: her son terry went through the school archives and confirmed it. 60 years later, the university trying to right an old wrong. on friday, mary will get the university's first-ever honorary undergraduate degree. >> there's an opportunity for her to have a different set of memories about missouri state than the ones she's carried for 60 years. >> you're 78 years old, what good does a college degree do? >> well, to say i tried. it's not a degree, it's a -- the thought of what i went through. >> reporter: among the students enrolled at missouri state now, her son. he's working toward a degree in criminology. a degree made possible by a mother who never had the chance. linsey davis, abc news, springfield, missouri. >> in a way the story does tell you how times have changed a little bit.
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she was denied but her son is getting the chance she never had, the real full cha n
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federal ruling. a judge's decision had a direct impact on arizona's immigration law. who's cheering and who's ready for a long fight. then, daytime drama. the criticism over president obama's appearance today on "the view." and, watching weight while pregnant. concerns about obesity before and after childbirth. it's thursday, july 29th. >> from abc news, this is "world news now." >> ah, yes, it's hard to hear but apparently you can't lose weight after the baby, you should be monitoring your weight the whole time. which we've heard before, but it brings a tear to my eye.
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i'd like to -- just the whole time i'm pregnant. >> i can't wait for that by the way. >> a freight train. good morning and thanks for being with us. i'm vinita nair. >> i'm rob nelson. parts of arizona's new immigration law are now being enforced but a federal judge has blocked its most controversial aspects. >> the state launches its legal fight today in a case that could end up in the supreme court. bill weir reports on the emotional debate from phoenix. >> reporter: there are more than a dozen parts to this new law. but the injunction blocks the most controversy. those that make it a state crime to live and work in arizona without papers. and those that require arizona cops to stop and check the status of anyone reasonably suspicious of being here illegally. >> by no means is the battle over. next step will be reviewing in the united states court of appeals, then ultimately likely on to the supreme court. >> reporter: the ruling comes from judge susan bolton, a clinton appointee who in ten
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years on the federal bench earned a reputation for being meticulous and objective. she writes, there is a substantial likelihood officers will wrongfully arrest legal resident aliens under the new law, and the surge in stops and arrests will divert resources from the federal government's other responsibilities. while the latino community rejoiced in their victory, most of the state supports the law and some filled the airwaves with anger. >> when does it stop? when's enough enough? >> reporter: echoing their frustration with the feds, arizona's republican governor, who vows the legal fight has just begun. >> we knew regardless of what happened today, of course, that one side or the other side was going to appeal. so this begins the process. this is just an injunction, a temporary injunction. >> reporter: while his extra tents built to hold extra prisoners remain nearly empty, sheriff joe arpaio says they might be filled as he continues his controversial raids. >> if you come across someone
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speeding and we have certain criteria that that person is here illegally, we take action. >> reporter: but the judge did leave a number of provisions in place and it will still be illegal for day laborers to impede traffic, trying to wave down cars with people employing them. also illegal for small latino towns to create safe havens from federal immigration officers. but the teeth of this new law, mostly knocked out. at least for now. bill weir, abc news, phoenix. destructive fires have forced more than 2,000 people from their homes this morning in california. thousands of firefighters are battling the flames and winds in the mountains north of los angeles. dozens of buildings were burned by the worst of the two wildfires near tehachapi. eight more went up in flames in the sequoia national forest. the governor declared a state of emergency in kern county. an air force cargo plane has crashed near downtown anchorage, alaska. the c-17 went down at elmendorf air force base last evening. four crew members were on board.
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witnesses say they saw a fireball shoot hundreds of feet into the air. the air force says the giant plane was a local training mission. no word yet on whether anyone survived. it is a day of mourning in pakistan as investigators look into the cause of that nation's worst air disaster. 152 passengers, including two americans, died as their plane tried to land in bad weather. nick schifrin reports from islamabad. >> reporter: in the hills above islamabad, an airbus plane is in thousands of pieces. some still smoking. locals and rescue workers form an assembly line to sift through the massive wreck. they find some bodies still intact but most were burned beyond recognition. and helicopters fly body parts down the mountain. more than 150 people died at this site, including her entire family. "how would i know it would be her last good-bye?" all day long, rescue workers have had to walk up this mountain and walk back down. this is how they got to the site. a two to three-hour climb up the
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margalla hills. what they saw was horrific. "it was a scene out of doomsday. may god never show it to anybody else." "i was overwhelmed and felt like throwing up. my heart was sick." the plane was approachings the islamabad airport in the rain and fog. it's not clear why but the pilot discontinued the approach. the tower warned the pilot he appeared off-course, according to an airport official. he replied, "don't worry, i can still see the runway." but the plane never regained altitude and eyewitnesses said it seemed off-balance as it hit the hill. >> the flight path of this aircraft is probably the main factor. you've got weather, you've got mountainous terrain, you've got other things that may not even be known to us at this particular time. >> reporter: it was a painful day. deadlier than any terror attack in the country's history. nick schifrin, abc news, islamabad. an air ambulance has crashed in tucson, arizona, killing three crew members. an eyewitness says the helicopter's rotors stopped
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working before the crash. the pilot was able to steer the falling chopper away from a house. it hit a fence and burst into flames. the pilot, flight nurse and paramedic died. no patients were on board. people around the world have been poring over the 92,000 secret military documents leaked to the media this week. the names of afghans who have helped the u.s. by providing information were among the secrets revealed and now they may be in grave danger. martha raddatz has the story. >> reporter: we are blurring the namen but al qaeda and the taliban have already been able to see them on the wikileaks website. names of ordinary afghans who have risked their lives to help american forces, and now could very well lose their lives. >> it's entirely possible that within days, weeks, people will kind of an exposure. >> reporter: there are numerous examples. the identity of the district chief of a village we won't name, informed coalition forces that the taliban are planning to attack district offices soon.
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this one names a man who was trying to defect from the taliban and turned over a letter about taliban plans for attacks. and another one, the name of a local man who had gone to the u.s. military to tell them the name of a taliban leader responsible in a recent attack by an estimated 100-plus taliban fighters in response to u.s. operations. the head of wikileaks, amlie er dcer no idea how to protect sources and how to protect lives. >> reporter: the pentagon is going through all the documents as well and local commanders will certainly try to do what they can to help those afghans who are at risk. but because of the massive amount of reports there is no guarantee they can get to the
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people in time. martha raddatz, abc news, washington. the body of former pro basketball player lorenzen wright has apparently been found in memphis. wright was last seen ten days ago when he was expected to take a flight. sources say it appeared wright had been shot several times and the body was found near a wooded area. a power forward, wright played in the nba for 13 years, most recently with the cleveland cavaliers. a south florida teenager is in serious condition after he was shot with a spear gun. the 16-year-old victim was being towed behind a boat when a friend's spear gun accidentally went off, striking him in the neck. the teens were able to flag down a police marine unit who helped them get back to shore. wet, windy and isolated tornados in the dakotas and northern nebraska. heavy rain in much of the
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southwest. thunderstorms and downpours in boston, new york, philadelphia, and dc. isolated showers in tennessee, alabama, and mississippi. >> mostly 90s along the eastern seaboard and gulf coast. 82 in detroit. 84 in chicago. 87 in omaha. phoenix will hit 105. colorado springs 95. albuquerque 88. under the golden arches, you can find anything from mcnuggets to a mcmuffin, and apparently even a mcbaby. >> an upstate new york couple was racing to the hospital when the mother to be realized time was running out. i think you know where this is headed. the husband pulled into a mcdonald's parking lot to wait for an ambulance just as his wife gave her final push. the healthy baby boy was crying when paramedics arrived. >> the baby has already received his first happy meal. his older brothers actually ate it but they were nice enough to save the baby the box. >> they should name the baby ronald after ronald mcdonald.
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>> i'm sure they'll take that into account. >> i'm sure they'll take that into account. we'll be right back. [ funny voice ]uster! wanna attract dust like swiffer 360 duster? then try the magnet hat! ♪ wow! [ female announcer ] sorry, duster, but swiffer 360 dusters attract dust with over 500,000 fibers and lock it away to clean better than a feather duster. swiffer's built smarter to clean better.
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that is former first lady nancy reagan joining california
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governor arnold schwarzenegger for an event close to her heart. it was a ceremonial bill signing declaring ronald reagan day on february 6th. the state will officially remember the 40th president starting next year on what would have been his 100th birthday. later today, president obama makes history but not for any kind of new law or doctrine. >> he'll become the first sitting president to appear on daytime tv. so, does his visit to "the view" have precedence or is it unpresidential? yunji de nies has a closer look. >> reporter: president obama got comfy with the co-hosts. discussing in an interview for the full hour of "the view" the roses and thorns, his highs and lows. >> in the last month, the rose has to be a couple of days we took in maine with michelle and sasha and malia. they're not quite teenagers yet so they still like you. >> thorn? >> where do i begin here? >> reporter: but even before he reached this couch, the critics
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pounced, questioning on "morning joe" whether doing daytime is truly presidential. >> i wouldn't put him on "jerry springer" either, right? i think the president of the united states has to go on serious shows. >> reporter: "the new york daily news" went further. charging two wars, oil crisis, crashed economy and he's whooping it up with whoopi? even former co-host rosie o'donnell agreed "the view" isn't the right venue. >> i don't think sitting presidents should go do fluffy daytime tv shows. >> reporter: the president is no "view" virgin. >> please welcome presidential nominee senator john mccain. >> reporter: stopping by to dish about hot topics has become a campaign must. but are the rules different for a commander in chief? >> it so is hard to break through, and there's so much
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noise -- >> reporter: white house communications director dan pfeiffer says getting a message out in the modern media age requires creativity. >> we're trying to basically solve a riddle, which is that people are more interested in government and politics than they've ever been before, they're more informed on what's happening in the world, yet they're watching traditional news sources less. they're getting information somewhere. how do you reach those people? that's what we're trying to figure out every day. >> he hasn't had a primetime press conference in more than a year. are you guys trying to bypass that? >> don't take the fact that he's done leno and letterman and "the view" as avoiding the press. we're doing them in addition to the traditional press. >> reporter: plenty of people accuse the president of being overexposed. does it really hurt him? >> they don't care what we think. the white house does not care what we think. they care what the ladies of "the view" think and they care
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what the ladies who watch "the view" think. they have come to washington with the firm belief it is not their job to win over the political press and they don't care if they win over the political press. >> reporter: the white house is well aware that the boss shines in more casual public appearances, versus the formal press conferences, where he often gets dubbed professor obama. >> that takes care of about two-thirds of the cost. the remaining one-third is what the argument has been abo- show does inpeobo what the cool, calm, collecte kind of hip guy that america fell in love with. i feel like i'm talking about a teen idol. >> repon 3 c culespely i the wo >> tha pcd ab people be frustrated with him, but he's still one of the nation's hottest celebrities even though he may not be very popular politically. >> reporter: what hot topic should the president weigh in on? >> i personally would love for the ladies of "the view" to ask
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him about mel gibson. i think that mel's a real candidate for the next beer summit. >> how did you guys prepare for this? do you do a presidential briefing on hot topics? >> we leave it the and his daughters to keep him up to date on those sorts of things. after all, being constantly surrounded by women is well within mr. obama's comfort zone. i'm yunji de nies at the white house. >> i mean, after all, he was the first president to really tackle late night. he was on leno, he was on letterman. then remember he did espn two years ago. it is a valid point, people get their news from less traditional formats. a lot of people watch "the daily show with jon stewart." that's the source of ne a touchy subject for many parents who of course may be up at this late hour. >> it involves weight durifd
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many new mothers watching
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this morning might be thinking, how can i lose all that unwanted baby weight? >> a new british medical report says the battle to lose weight should start before childbirth, and not after delivery. the bbc's jane hughes has more. >> reporter: the battle to shed the baby fat. these mums are winning but many others gain weight they never manage to lose again. >> well done, hands above the head -- >> reporter: pregnancy weight is a more significant issue than many women realize and there's a lot of advice about. >> it's more looking after yourself rather than losing weight or how much you're putting on. so it's more healthy eating and just keeping up the exercise. that's what i'd done when i was pregnant to carrying on exercising as long as possible. >> reporter: every mum's anxious to do what's right for her baby. but the trouble is when it comes to gaining and losing weight there's contradictory advice out there. this guidance is designed to help women cut through all that. it recommends getting to a
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healthy weight before you're pregnant, maintaining that healthy weight, and exercising gently while you're expecting, and taking time to lose any baby fat after giving birth. the risks of being overweight and pregnant are very serious. nearly half of all women of childbearing age could be affected. >> the risks include gestational diabetes, preeclampsia, potential for stillbirth, miscarriage. it's therefore very, very important to limit the amount of weight you put on during pregnancy and to get to a good weight before the pregnancy begins. this protects the mother and it protects the child. >> reporter: a lot of mums know to give up smoking and drinking to protect their babies while they're pregnant. now they're being advised to think more about what they weigh as well.
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jane hughes, bbc news. >> my sister gave birth a month ago so i'm well-versed in this after the baby losing weight. the reality is you are losing 300 to 600 calories nursing. they do it multiple times a day, obviously. you have to continuously keep the weight on in a sense. you don't want to lose it immediately like you see a lot of celebrities. unrealistic. >> you are eating for two. there was no life insurance. no life insurance? that's terrible. funerals are so expensive. i know. that's why i bought a policy through the colonial penn program. it costs less than 35 cents a day, which fit right into my budget. i didn't have to answer any health questions or take a physical, and i couldn't be turned down because of my health. you know, there are several options for people my age, too. so i went to cpdirect.com and i applied online. it was easy. whether you're getting new insurance or supplementing coverage you already have, call about the colonial penn program now. guaranteed acceptance life insurance is a popular plan for people aged 50 to 85.
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why go one more round ? you don't need a rematch, but a rethink. with lunesta. lunesta is thought to interact with gaba receptors associated with sleep. lunesta helps you get the restful sleep you need. lunesta has some risk of dependency. when taking lunesta, don't drive or operate machinery until you feel fully awake. walking, eating, driving or engaging in other activities while asleep without remembering it the next day have been reported. abnormal behaviors may include aggressiveness, agitation, hallucinations, or confusion. in depressed patients, worsening of depression, including risk of suicide, may occur. alcohol may increase these risks. allergic reactions such as tongue or throat swelling occur rarely and may be fatal. side effects may include unpleasant taste, headache, dizziness, and morning drowsiness. stop fighting with your sleep. ask your doctor if lunesta is right for you.
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get lunesta for a co-pay as low as zero dollars at lunesta.com discover a restful lunesta night. world news now delivers your "morning papers." >> do you ever get a little bit nervous if you're in a plane and there's a lot of turbulence, a weird feeling something's about to go horribly wrong? have you ever been in that situation? >> i don't get nervous but i've seen people freak. >> i clench the seat. i totally freak out. imagine if you were in this situation. check out this video. >> batik! arggh! [ screaming ]
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>> no, just a joke. that is the worst joke to play on your friend. that guy pretended he was the pilot, fainting while flying that plane, ended up just a joke. everything was okay. that's the cruelest joke i've ever seen. >> that's just mean. >> i would have had a hard time, i would have been done anyway. would have been done. >> are these two still friends? >> i wouldn't be. no way in the world. cruel joke. >> p.e.t.a. has had a lot of ad campaigns and a lot have been very successful, like the i'd rather go nude than wear fur. >> good ad. >> if you're having breakfast, look away. it is really, really graphic. you're about to see these images. this was their newest way to get people to stop eating meat and you're going to see the images
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right now. what that is, those are actually p.e.t.a. members and they got on like the plastic trays that your meat come on? they wrapped themselvesund cf1 andu cnre >> some people need help keeping the rhythm. >> some people need help with >> i'm even more shocked that's on "the huffington post." like we don't know anyth about it. last minute.
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a federal judge steps in before arizona's controversial immigration law goes into effect. the impact of her ruling. then, chest compressions. new guidelines for cpr. ♪ ♪ staying alive, staying alive >> saving lives to the beat of a movie soundtrack. and, dental dollars. a world leader's dentures go on sale today. it's thursday, july 29th. >> from abc news, this is "world news now." ♪ ha, ha, ha, ha staying alive that's a good one, that works. >> i bet the next time people
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are doing cpr, they will think about that. it's all about the beat. >> some people need help keeping the rhythm. >> some people need help with rhythm. >> good morning, everybody, i'm rob nelson. >> i'm vinita nair. a watered-down version of arizona's new immigration law is taking effect today. expect a showdown over the most controversial aspects of the law. >> the state will go to a federal appeals court today in san francisco, demanding that the entire law be allowed to go forward. t.j. winick is following the story. good morning, t.j. >> reporter: good morning, rob and vinita. the republican-controlled arizona legislature passed the nation's toughest anti-immigration law three months ago saying the federal government had not done enough on the issue. arizona police were getting ready to enforce the controversial immigration law. demonstrators were set to protest against a law they call racial profiling. but instead, the demonstrators
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are celebrating. >> change the powers to be to make sure we're no longer targeted as a community. >> reporter: most of the state's immigration law will still take effect. but a federal judge has blocked the most controversial provisions of sb-1070, including the requirement police check a person's immigration status while enforcing other laws, and making it a crime to look for work if you're here illegally. >> by no means is the battle over. the next step will be review in the united states court of appeals, then ultimately likely on to the supreme court. >> reporter: the ruling comes from judge susan bolton, a clinton appointee. she writes that, there is a substantial likelihood officers will wrongfully arrest legal resident aliens under the law and a surge in stops and arrests will divert resources from the government's other responsibilities. arizona's governor, a strong proponent of the law, vows to fight on.
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>> we knew regardless of what happened today, of course, one side or the other side was going to appeal. so this begins the process. >> reporter: and while his extra tents built to hold extra prisoners remain nearly empty, sheriff joe arpaio insists they'll be put to use as he continues his controversial raids.- yous soe illeallae a raids.- yous soe illeallae a immigration law, saye state had the right to rob and a bear has killed one perso ck elowk inhas killed one perso montana. the bear ripped campers from their tents in the middle of the night at three separate sites. wildlife experts say the victims had not left food out or done anything to attract the bears. the campsiteed an parswen set bear traps. the animal will be killed if it is captured. it is a day of mourning in pakistan after the worst air disaster in that nation's history. everyone on board was killed when a passenger plane plunged
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into a mountain as it tried to now comes thestign. habc'att. rer:thrte search for survivors was hampered by bad weather and tough terrain. the plane hit the steep wooded hillside. "i saw many bodies in pieces," said this man. "i saw a child in a tree branch." the search for survivors was in vain. authorities say all 152 people on board, including two americans, were killed. operated by pakistani carrier airblue, had 146 passengers and six crew on board for the flight from karachi to the capital islamabad. >> there was no technical fault when it took off. >> reporter: but as the crew prepared to land in heavy monsoon rain and thick fog, the control tower lost contact. the plane smashed into hills just outside the city and caught fire on impact. it was an airbus 321. a popular mid-range jet with a good safety record. used by 70 carriers around the world. distraught relatives of the missing waited for news. others headed to the crash site. "i want to know if my brother is
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alive." the pilot was found dead on that hillside. no one is saying yet exactly why this plane crashed. bad weather certainly appears to be a factor. nick watt, abc news, london. a u.s. military cargo plane has crashed at an alaska air force base. the c-17 with four passengers on board went down at elmendorf air force base in anchorage last evening. witnesses say the crash sent a huge fireball 750 feet into the air. the air force said the c-17 was on a local training mission at the time. no word on the four people who were on board. in other news now, work to permanently plug the gulf oil leak could begin as early as sunday night. >> if all goes well the latest step could stop the leak for good, despite some setbacks. diana alvear is in buras, louisiana, this morning. hi, diana. >> reporter: vinita and rob, good morning.
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101 days after the initial explosion, we have mixed results. progress is happening in killing that damaged oil well for good. but the cleanup efforts are suffering setback after setback. the immediate aftermath of the deepwater horizon explosion was bad enough. 11 workers trapped on the burning rig lost their lives. then came the oil. millions of gallons gushing into the gulf. oil-soaked birds. tar balls washing ashore. 100 days later it's a much different picture. this was the size of the spill at its height one month ago. this week most of the oil is gone. >> in the beginning i figured we'd be here maybe two or three years cleaning this up. >> you thought you'd be here two or three years? >> yeah. now, if we make it another six days, i'd be surprised. >> reporter: skimmer boats remain anchored. there's no oil for them to scoop. >> where we find oil we are
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skimming it. if not, they're on standby. >> reporter: researchers say the oil is still there, simply sunk beneath the surface. they say the effect on marine life is anyone's guess. the oil that's made to it shore is already having an effect. >> nearly one in five beaches in the gulf coast region that are regularly monitored have been closed or under advisory or notice because of the oil spill. >> reporter: that oil spill is quickly coming to a close. crews are on track to killing the damaged well, permanently stopping the flow. >> we are optimistic we'll get this thing done. >> reporter: at the last briefing federal officials were asked about comments from incoming bp ceo bob dudley, who ithimed that damaged well may be saying both operation static kill and operation bottom kill need to happen before they can claim success. vinita, rob? now here's a look at your thursday forecast. hail and isolated tornados in the dakotas and northern nebraska. heavy downpours from arizona to colorado.
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thunderstorms possible in much of the northeast and in ge wet from nashville o birmingham. >> 90amio nw york. pleasant and in the 80s across 75 in seattle. 85 in sacramento. a scorching 105 out in phoenix. it's a pony express of sorts and this only happens once a year. >> about 150 ponies took the plunge yesterday, swimming across a 200-yard channel between maryland and virginia. it was the 85th annual pony swim at chincoteague. the event made famous by the 1947 novel "misty of chincoteague." >> 40,000 spectators showed up to watch this year. these ponies will be auctioned off. hopefully after a bath. the money goes to a volunteer fire department that cares for the herd. we'll be right back. hoveround power chair? the statue of liberty? the grand canyon? it's all possible ith a hoveround., tom: hi i'm tom kruse, inventor rand founder of hoveround., when we say you're free to see the world, we mean it. call today and get a free overound information kit,
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it will compete with apple's popular ipad. the new kindle is available for preorder and the cost, unbelievably $139. it ships at the end of next month. amazon's e-books now outsell the company's hard-cover books. >> changing times. now to medical news. and recommendations on the simplified techniques for cpr. >> two new studies show any untrained person can save a life, and our senior medical editor dr. richard besser shows us what we need to know. >> reporter: in that moment of crisis, you only need to know two simple steps to save a life. first, call 911. then, start cpr, but with just chest compressions. the two new studies confirm for bystanders with no training, chest compressions on adults are enough to restore life and there is no benefit to performing mouth to mouth resuscitation. here's why chest compressions alone work. after you've stopped breathing there's enough air in your lungs to keep you will alive until
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help usually arrives. but that oxygen must be circulated throughout your body, to your brain, to your heart. pumping the chest moves that oxygen around. pausing that pumping to breathe into the victim's mouth means a break in that critical circulation to the heart, increasing the risk of death. after you call 911, position yourself directly over the chest of the victim. one hand in the center of the chest, the other on top. then begin to pump, hard and fast. remember, 100 beats per minute. if you can't remember that, then remember this. ♪ staying alive, staying alive >> reporter: do chest compressions to the beat of "staying alive." ♪ staying alive >> reporter: only one-third of those who go into cardiac arrest get cpr from a bystander. the hope is that by making it easier to do, more people will be willing to do it. >> if you haven't been trained in cpr, should you give it a shot anyway? >> yeah, you're not going to --
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i always say that. we teach residents here. so we teach doctors. you're not going to make somebody more dead. >> reporter: these results apply to cpr by untrained people on adults only. cpr for children must still include mouth to mouth resuscitation. these are exciting studies that will hopefully lead people to act to save people's lives. richard besser, abc news, new york. >> that's interesting. good advice, most studies suggest people are much more willing to help out if mouth to mouth is not required. >> one of the best tips i've heard is if you go the distance between your navel -- your navel to your nose, halfway is where you hands should be. i think most people don't know. and you're pushing so hard you might break bones because you're triggering the heart through all the bones. >> you need to press hard. it's not like a light tap. >> i'm with you, i don't want to put my mouth on random mouths. >> just in general. in a moment we'll return to our top story on this thursday morning. >> the federal ruling on arizona's immigration law
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now back to our top story this morning. the blocking of the most controversial aspects of arizona's new immigration law.
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>> opponents have won this battle but its supporters say it's not the beginning -- it is the beginning, rather, of a big legal battle. here is "american landscape" coverage from knxv in phoenix. >> reporter: a bump in the road. that's how governor jan brewer described the federal judge's decision to block parts of the immigration law. abc 15's lori jane gliha is in tucson where the governor made several appearances today, and the governor telling us the fight isn't over and the state will soon appeal. >> reporter: governor brewer says her fight is far from over, she's been speaking with her legal counsel all day. she says though she is disappointed, she calls this ruling temporary. >> myself and my counsel believe that the senate bill 1070 was constitutional. we liked it all, of course, and we would have liked to have seen it all upheld. >> reporter: governor jan brewer says she will not quit in her fight to put all sections of the new immigration law into effect, calling a judge's ruling temporary, and a little bump in the road. >> jan brewer's not a quitter.
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the people of arizona's not a quitter. >> reporter: brewer explained supporters and opponents anticipated appeals all along depending on the judge's decision. now she says the fight is far from over. and argues the federal government must step up and take action to better keep arizona citizens safe. >> the federal government got relief from the courts to not to do their job. >> reporter: democratic gubernatorial candidate terry goddard turned to the internet to send brewer a message. >> terry goddard says you play politics with immigration and lost. what do you have to say to his tweet or do you have a tweet back to him? what do you think of that? >> terry goddard needs to do his job. >> reporter: continuously brewer has been calling on the federal government to do their jobs. she says she has plans to file an expedited appeal. in tucson, lori jane gliha. abc 15 news. a phoenix police officer also filed a suit challenging the law and calls the judge's decision a step in the right
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direction. abc 15's corey rangel spoke with one of the officers today. that officer says he's happy th act >> reporter: the ofsays he's relieved aoy i hisordss hea dge tru officer davado ile sevleng s unconnal. worte ld l racial profiling, even tough that. now salgado says the judge's ruling has put st >> now that we hear thejudg was in favor of the government, an, that lp th a police offi treat evl everybody, all ethnics. >> reporter: and the judge has o s ruln sa: and the judge has case specifically, but his attorney says the rn to su all of the lawsuits filed against the law. reporting live at the federal courthouse, corey rangel, abc 15 news. >> maricopa county attorney rick romley has pushed for immigration enforcement that focuses on violent criminals, not people in the country illegally. he says the injunction offers an opportunity. >> it is time for the federal
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government to deal with immigration reform. they need to understand, the federal government needs to clearly understand, they have not just failed arizona, but they have failed the rest of this nation. >> reporter: romley had questioned some of the wording of the law and a few potentially unconstitutional provisions, such as detaining suspects indefinitely to verify their immigration status. a big supporter of the law says he won't let today's decision stop him from doing his job. arpaio says he understands the judge's decision and respects it. but sheriff arpaio added it won't stop him from cracking down on illegal immigration. >> i'm sure she has a rationale for her decision. i don't think it's going to really hurt the fight against illegal immigration. you look at other laws, other federal laws that can be enforced. >> tomorrow, sheriff arpaio says
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his department is still planning a crime suppression sweep to coincide with the start of the now-modified new immigration law. he's keeping most of the details secret but says it will most likely happen around noon. the white house says president obama is not commenting on today's ruling. previously, the president had come out against the new law. president obama said he felt it interfered with federal immigration law and that it would lead to racial profiling. >> that was coverage from knxv in phoenix. >> and again, some parts of the law do go into effect or have gone into effect. you can no longer pick up and transport day laborers across the state. it is illegal to give a ride or harbor an illegal alien. some parts in effect right now. me history. if you fight to sleep in the middle of the night,
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and finally this half hour, getting your hands on some history. starting today, get this, a set of false teeth worn by winston churchill goes up for bid. just in time for christmas. >> ew. ew. the teeth helped the prime minister give some of the most inspirational speeches of world war ii, and now they can be yours. the bbc's mark worthington reports. >> we shall fight on the seas and oceans. we shall fight with growing confidence and growing strength in the air -- >> reporter: the unmistakable words of winston churchill. inspirational and instantly recognizable. >> we shall fight on the
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beaches. >> reporter: churchill had a natural speech impediment but thought his distinctive voice a crucial tool in winning the second world war. safe in a norfolk vault, the unlikely weapon in the war effort. a set of gold dentures specifically designed to preserve churchill's lisp and to keep his voice unaltered on the airwaves. >> we shall never surrender. >> reporter: churchill's dentures were made by a young dental technician called derek cudlipp, and they've been in his family since churchill's death. >> my father's work was very important to churchill. when my father's call-up papers came through, churchill asked for him, asked for the papers, and they were torn up in front of him. and churchill said to him, "you're going nowhere, you're staying here." >> what's making you sell these now? >> they've been in a drawer for many years. i'd like to see them on show to
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the wider public. >> reporter: at the royal college of surgeons in london the only other surviving set is one of the most popular exhibits. here, flanked by the teeth of royalty, churchill's dentures have pride of place. >> these are the teeth that saved the world. without them, he wouldn't have been able to deliver many of the great speeches that we know from the second world war. "we'll fight them on the beaches" would never have sounded the same. >> yes, who indeed would have thought this would be the most exceptional and most talked-about item i've ever sold at auction. >> reporter: churchill's dentures are valued at 5,000 pounds. the auctioneers say they could fetch tens of thousands when they go under the hammer. mark worthington, bbc news, norfolk. >> wow. apparently churchill loved his dentist so much he actually nominated him for knighthood. that's how close the two were. important chompers. >> i've never heard of this before but he apparently had a lisp. part of the problem was his
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lisp. what he would do is make sure he had an emergency pair of
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